out


out
I [[t]a͟ʊt[/t]] ADVERB USES
(Out is often used with verbs of movement, such as `walk' and `pull', and also in phrasal verbs such as `give out' and `run out'.)
1) ADV: ADV after v When something is in a particular place and you take it out, you remove it from that place.

Carefully pull out the centre pages...

He took out his notebook and flipped the pages...

They paid in that cheque a couple of days ago, and drew out around two thousand in cash.

2) ADV: ADV after v You can use out to indicate that you are talking about the situation outside, rather than inside buildings.

It's hot out - very hot, very humid.

Syn:
3) ADV: be ADV, ADV after v If you are out, you are not at home or not at your usual place of work.

I tried to get in touch with you yesterday evening, but I think you were out...

She had to go out.

Ant:
4) ADV: ADV adv/prep If you say that someone is out in a particular place, you mean that they are in a different place, usually one far away.

The police tell me they've finished their investigations out there...

Rosie's husband was now out East.

5) ADV: ADV after v, be ADV When the sea or tide goes out, the sea moves away from the shore.

The tide was out and they walked among the rock pools.

Ant:
6) ADV: ADV n If you are out a particular amount of money, you have that amount less than you should or than you did. [mainly AM]

Me and my friends are out ten thousand dollars, with nothing to show for it!

II [[t]a͟ʊt[/t]] ADJECTIVE AND ADVERB USES
1) ADJ: v-link ADJ If a light or fire is out or goes out, it is no longer shining or burning.

All the lights were out in the house...

Several of the lights went out, one after another.

2) ADJ: v-link ADJ If flowers are out, their petals have opened.

Well, the daffodils are out in the gardens and they're always a beautiful show.

ADV: ADV after v
Out is also an adverb.

I usually put it in my diary when I see the wild flowers coming out.

3) ADJ: v-link ADJ If something such as a book or record is out, it is available for people to buy.

...cover versions of 40 British Number Ones - out now.

ADV: ADV after v
Out is also an adverb.

The French edition came out in early 1992.

4) ADJ: v-link ADJ If workers are out, they are on strike. [INFORMAL]

We've been out for two and a half months and we're not going back until we get what we're asking for.

Syn:
on strike
ADV: ADV after v
Out is also an adverb.

In June last year, 26 people came out on strike protesting against a compulsory 65-hour week.

5) ADJ: v-link ADJ In a game or sport, if someone is out, they can no longer take part either because they are unable to or because they have been defeated.
6) ADJ: usu v-link ADJ In baseball, a player is out if they do not reach a base safely. When three players in a team are out in an inning, then the team is out.
7) ADJ: v-link ADJ If you say that a proposal or suggestion is out, you mean that it is unacceptable.

That's right out, I'm afraid.

8) ADJ: v-link ADJ If you say that a particular thing is out, you mean that it is no longer fashionable at the present time.

Romance is making a comeback. Reality is out.

Ant:
9) ADJ-GRADED: v-link ADJ, oft amount ADJ If you say that a calculation or measurement is out, you mean that it is incorrect.

When the two ends of the tunnel met in the middle they were only a few inches out.

10) ADJ: v-link ADJ to-inf If someone is out to do something, they intend to do it. [INFORMAL]

Most companies these days are just out to make a quick profit.

III [[t]a͟ʊt[/t]] VERB USE
outs, outing, outed
If a group of people out a public figure or famous person, they reveal that person's homosexuality against their wishes.

[V n] The New York gay action group `Queer Nation' recently outed an American Congressman.

Derived words:
outing N-UNCOUNT

The gay and lesbian rights group, Stonewall, sees outing as completely unhelpful.

IV PREPOSITION USES
(Out of is used with verbs of movement, such as `walk' and `pull', and also in phrasal verbs such as `do out of' and `grow out of'. In American English and informal British English, out is often used instead of out of.)
1) PHR-PREP If you go out of a place, you leave it.

She let him out of the house.

Ant:
2) PHR-PREP If you take something out of the container or place where it has been, you remove it so that it is no longer there.

I always took my key out of my bag and put it in my pocket.

3) PHR-PREP If you look or shout out of a window, you look or shout away from the room where you are towards the outside.

He went on staring out of the window...

He looked out the window at the car on the street below.

4) PHR-PREP If you are out of the sun, the rain, or the wind, you are sheltered from it.

People can keep out of the sun to avoid skin cancer.

5) PHR-PREP If someone or something gets out of a situation, especially an unpleasant one, they are then no longer in it. If they keep out of it, they do not start being in it.

In the past army troops have relied heavily on air support to get them out of trouble...

The economy is starting to climb out of recession...

The Salvation Army has worked in the big cities to keep endangered young people out of a life of crime.

6) PHR-PREP You can use out of to say that someone leaves an institution.

You come out of university and find there are no jobs available...

Doctors should be able to decide who they can safely let out of hospital early.

7) PHR-PREP If you are out of range of something, you are beyond the limits of that range.

Shaun was in the bedroom, out of earshot, watching television...

He turned to look back, but by then she was out of sight.

8) PHR-PREP You use out of to say what feeling or reason causes someone to do something. For example, if you do something out of pity, you do it because you pity someone.

He took up office out of a sense of duty...

Some people have left out of embarrassment at what's happened to them.

9) PHR-PREP If you get something such as information or work out of someone, you manage to make them give it to you, usually when they are unwilling to give it.

`Where is she being held prisoner?' I asked. `Did you get it out of him?'...

We knew we could get better work out of them.

10) PHR-PREP If you get pleasure or an advantage out of something, you get it as a result of being involved with that thing or making use of it.

We all had a lot of fun out of him...

To get the most out of your money, you have to invest.

Syn:
11) PHR-PREP If you are out of something, you no longer have any of it.

I can't find the sugar - and we're out of milk.

12) PHR-PREP If something is made out of a particular material, it consists of that material because it has been formed or constructed from it.

Would you advise people to make a building out of wood or stone?

Syn:
13) PHR-PREP: num PREP num You use out of to indicate what proportion of a group of things something is true of. For example, if something is true of one out of five things, it is true of one fifth of all things of that kind.

Two out of five thought the business would be sold privately on their retirement or death...

In 99 cases out of a hundred this will be done more effectively by the army.

Syn:

English dictionary. 2008.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • out — out …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Out — (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.] In its… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Out at — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Out in — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Out of — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Out on — Out Out (out), adv. [OE. out, ut, oute, ute, AS. [=u]t, and [=u]te, [=u]tan, fr. [=u]t; akin to D. uit, OS. [=u]t, G. aus, OHG. [=u]z, Icel. [=u]t, Sw. ut, Dan. ud, Goth. ut, Skr. ud. [root]198. Cf. {About}, {But}, prep., {Carouse}, {Utter}, a.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • out — out·age; out·back·er; out·breathed; out·bye; out·come; out·com·er; out·com·ing; out·cri·er; out·crop·per; out·done; out·door; out·doors·man; out·doorsy; out·er·most; out·fang·thief; out·field·er; out·field·ing; out·fields·man; out·fit·ter;… …   English syllables

  • Out 1 — The title card to Out 1 Directed by Jacques Rivette Suzanne Schiffman (co director) …   Wikipedia

  • out — [ aut ] adv. et adj. inv. • 1891; mot angl. « hors de » ♦ Anglic. I ♦ Adv. Tennis Hors des limites du court. Adj. La balle est out. II ♦ Adj. inv. (1966) Se dit de qqn qui se trouve dépassé, rejeté hors d une évolution ou incapable de la suivre… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Out — may refer to: Media Out (film), a short 1957 film produced by the United Nations about the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 Out (1982 film), 1982 American movie (also known as Deadly Drifter directed by Eli Hollander, starring Peter Coyote Out… …   Wikipedia

  • Out — (out), n. 1. One who, or that which, is out; especially, one who is out of office; generally in the plural. [1913 Webster] 2. A place or space outside of something; a nook or corner; an angle projecting outward; an open space; chiefly used in the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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